Cenotaph

Architect

Lutyens, Sir Edwin

Date of design

1922-24

About the work

The word “cenotaph” is from the Greek for “empty tomb”. The monumental column surmounted by the prone figure of the “Unknown Soldier” was intended to represent both the weight of sadness and loss associated with the war while also being a tribute to its triumphant end.


Portland stone pylon surmounted by a bier on which lies a representation of a soldier covered with a coat. Two obelisks flank the central pylon.


The Great War Stone stands in front of the podium. It is 12 feet long and is a replica of the stone of remembrance erected on the cemeteries and battlegrounds in France. On it are inscribed the words: THEIR NAME LIVETH FOR EVERMORE

Inscriptions

The north-east side of the memorial bears the inscription: TO THE HONOURED MEMORY OF THOSE WHO GAVE THEIR LIVES FOR THEIR COUNTRY


On the south west side the inscription is: O LORD GOD OF OUR FATHERS KEEP FOR EVER IN THE IMAGINATION OF THE THOUGHTS OF THE HEART OF THY PEOPLE

In the collection

View the Manchester Art Gallery Online Collections page for this work.

Location & Map

The cenotaph is located in the Memorial garden opposite the Central Library.


The placemarker on the map below shows the location of this monument.

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View a larger version of this map.